FEATURED

Q1 2018: Research & Development

When TEECOM established our Research & Development group ten years ago, it grew out of the need to address the number one question we heard from clients: What’s next for technology? “What’s next” is a primary driver in business, science, and culture. But how do we know that what we build today will be able to handle emerging technologies? At TEECOMlabs, we test products by putting them into real-world simulations, we push the limits of systems compatibility, we prototype our own hardware and software, and we provide consulting and thought leadership. We’re advancing understanding of how artificial intelligence, mixed reality, and other technologies change our relationship to the built environment.

Featured
ArticleS
Creating a Personality for Buildings: Part Two
Posted by Jake Tesler
ArticleS
3 Lessons from the World’s Best Innovation Labs
Posted by Editorial Team
ArticleS
Creating a Personality for Buildings: Part One
Posted by Jake Tesler
TEECOMlabs: Exploring Near Future Technology
Posted by Editorial Team
ArticleS
TEECOM Research Saves Hospital Client $184,800 in Hardware Costs
Posted by Gil Lopez
ArticleS
Buy or Build? Why TEECOM Created a Contact Management Tool In-House
Posted by Editorial Team

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  • A Tech Infrastructure Tour of San Francisco’s Salesforce Tower

    Posted by in , /

    As we all know, there’s an engineering talent shortage right now. In reaction to this, TEECOM has been raising awareness about low-voltage engineering as a career path through outreach to college students and our summer internship program, TEECOMuniversity. Recently, one of our former interns from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, introduced us to the Cal … Read more

  • A Better AV Punch List: Collaborative Acceptance Testing

    Posted by in , /

    Acceptance testing is a critical part of every audiovisual project. During audiovisual acceptance testing, the AV consultant examines and tests a project’s nearly completed audiovisual systems to ensure that they perform as intended and are installed professionally. Systems that work well but have visible flaws aren’t accepted, and neither are systems that have operational problems, even if they look good.